Magazine Features

  • GreenCraft Magazine, Spring 2016

    GreenCraft Magazine, Spring 2016

  • GreenCraft Magazine, Spring 2016

    GreenCraft Magazine, Spring 2016

Reviews & Listings

  • Studios Magazine, Summer 2014

    Studios Magazine, Summer 2014

  • Studios Magazine, Summer 2014

    Studios Magazine, Summer 2014

Features & Reviews
  • Burdastyle, September 2014

    Burdastyle, September 2014

  • Burdastyle, September 2014

    Burdastyle, September 2014

“Rebecca Shelly’s Local Victory highlights the ways in which genetically altered foods could spell ecological disaster. Nifty cast-resin sculptures in the shape of tiny trees cleverly show the ecosphere’s march from naturally to artificiality.” Speer, Richard, “Now Showing; Rebecca Shelly,” Art Listing, Willamette Week. November 19th and 26th, 2008.

“These smaller paintings in the exhibit echo the didactic tone of the 40′s propaganda posters, yet she pushes beyond the earlier war-effort message to one which is contemporary to our own times. The mixed-media and layered approach brings the viewer into the artwork in a more intimate way. What was before a message of pedantic pronouncements becomes, under her skillful hands, more of an invitation to participation.” Urton, Robin, “Local Victory: A Renewal of the Victory Garden.” Thoughts on Art & Creative Living. November 18th, 2008.

“Hung simply, without framing, the twin watercolor paintings making up Rebecca Shelly’s superb “Labor Day in the Gorge” portray in white silhouette a smattering of tourists dwarfed by a vast brown mass of subtly transforming hues and shades. In the middle of a crevice of light casts a striking, godlike presence.” Libby, Brian, “Divide Entices Interaction,” (Review of Do No Harm vs. Step Up), The Oregonian, February 9, 2007. 


“Perhaps the most inventive contribution, and arguably the most potent achievement of the lot in terms of making the most out of a perfuntory mission, is painter Rebecca Shelly’s tranformation of her violin into the body of a trompe-l’oeil pomegranate”….”for the most part, Shelly’s design succeeds in making use of an off-kilter tension between the shape and form of the instrument and the illusion space it bears- a space between whose edges the skin of the pomegranate opens up to clusters of fleshy seeds. Here the food does the talking. It speaks to the eroticism, hardly so crass as to be sexual, that links making and comsuming food and art and music- a dynamism that the violin seems to embody in its form as weel as its sound.” Thompson, Chris, “Bridge to Belly. Strung out on the PSO’s violin variations.” The Portland Phoenix, March 5-11, 2004.